Family news & insights

  • Globe & Mail: Provinces harm family finances by playing politics with $10-a-day child care

    Two years into the rollout of federal funding for $10-a-day child care, the plan still isn’t firing on all cylinders. But it isn’t a sign that the plan is broken. It signals that provinces are playing politics with federal funding rather than urgently reducing financial hardships facing young families.

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  • Globe & Mail: Past governments didn’t work out how to pay for boomers’ retirement

    The deficits announced in Ottawa’s fall economic statement remind us that previous governments never worked out how to pay for the healthy retirement of baby boomers. The personal finances of younger Canadians are collateral damage.

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  • Parties misdiagnose biggest changes in Fall Economic Statement

    Federal parties have misdiagnosed the biggest changes in 2023 Fall Economic Statement. Canada needs a federal task force on generational fairness to correct these misperceptions of federal finances.

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  • New policy solutions for families

    Despite historic government investments in child care, Canadian families still find themselves squeezed by rising costs, scarce supports, and services that are difficult to access. Government budgets still invest more urgently in retirees than younger Canadians — even when new child care spending is added in. Gen Squeeze is paving the way for much-needed policy change with a new solutions framework to support young families.

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  • The Globe & Mail: Merit, luck or extraction? Revisiting the stories we tell about our financial status

    Nobody likes to be challenged about whether they earned all that they have. Some get defensive when I talk about winning the “lottery of timing” by becoming a homeowner years ago, or when I raise concerns that younger Canadians inherit unaffordability and climate problems in which I’m partly implicated. Breaking through this defensiveness is necessary if Canada is to work once again for young and old alike.

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  • Intergenerational Fairness Day has arrived

    Today, November 16, 2023, is the first global Intergenerational Fairness Day. The urgent need to reverse the deteriorating well-being of younger and future generations stretches beyond Canada. Voices from the US, Germany, UK, Netherlands, Japan, Nigeria, and Australia as well as United Nations Foundation Next Generation Fellows have joined together to call on governments to preserve what is sacred – a healthy childhood, home, and planet – so that we can all be proud of the legacy we leave for those who follow. 

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  • Five reasons Canada needs a Generational Fairness Task Force

    We’ll never be able to fix today’s affordability, housing, medical care, and climate crises without understanding and resolving the intergenerational tensions at their core. Here are five impacts a federal Generational Fairness Task Force will have on key decisions made at Cabinet and Treasury tables.

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  • The policy changes we need for more work-life balance

    Trading shorter work weeks for longer working lives would improve work-life balance for younger generations and ease the massive demographic squeeze on government budgets.

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  • The Agenda: Do our life milestones need updating?

    Gen Squeeze founder Dr. Paul Kershaw recently joined TVO's The Agenda with Steve Paikin for a discussion about how life milestone timelines are changing and even disappearing. If the standard life-stage achievements for graduation, career, marriage, children, homeowning, and retirement created predictability and comfort, what happens when people don't meet those marks?

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  • The Globe & Mail: Key affordability issues ignored by UCP and NDP in Alberta’s election

    Affordability is a top concern for Alberta voters. So it is surprising that the United Conservative Party and the NDP have blind spots on this issue, especially when it comes to younger Albertans. 

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